Scaffold on Saturday

Brings back memories of Lily the Pink?

I was watching the scaffolders on my trip back from the job centre yesterday and was truly amazed at their fluid teamwork. (They are doing it again today so the title of this post isn’t totally inaccurate)

As there are lots of blocks of flats in Gib, there is obviously a lot of scaffolding when the outsides need refurbishment.

I’ve watched scaffolders throwing down the metal clips to each other with serious precision. This lot were passing down the planks (and poles) from one floor to the next – don’t forget none of them can see the one above.

It’s on a slide show as hopefully that conveys the motion.

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And on refurbishment of government housing blocks, this week the Gib government committed to continuing with the programme of refurbishment on the Alameda estate (the one in the slide show). This is probably due to all the whingey residents who keep asking Partner and everyone else on site when their block is going to get done – there are about half a dozen blocks. (Said Partner is the one in white overalls and a red hard hat on the top level (7th) of scaffolding in the photos).

The government has also said:

“Indeed, we will also refurbish Moorish Castle Estate, Glacis Estate and Laguna Estate which were completely neglected by the GSD when they were in Government and where refurbishment is now all the more important,” said Housing Minister Charles Bruzon.

Well they would wouldn’t they? These are not Gibraltar’s most desirable addresses. But they probably do account for that tiny majority that guaranteed success for the GSLP in last December’s election. Pay back time.

Which is probably also why the previous GSD government didn’t bother with those grot estates that needed the work but instead focused on Montagu estate (a lot of owner occupiers, and far more flash), followed by Alameda, probably one where they could have hoped to swing the vote. Trouble with the Alameda estate is, there are an awful lot of older people there, and they actually liked the Good Old Days of Joe Bossano. Tales from the Alameda to follow.

Glacis and Laguna have been crying out for refurbishment for years, so that announcement gets a thumbs up from me. No pix of those as they are, well, grot.

Note: for non Gib readers which is virtually all of you, govt housing is the same as council housing, assisted housing, public housing etc etc, ie cheap subsidised rented housing provided by the govt, which is sometimes bought by the occupiers – but not always. The current rent in Alameda is around £20 a week, so I understand….

Here, is the sign for one of the blocks, extremely well painted I might say. One of the rather more arty bits of work Partner got to do. I think it merits a photo on its own.

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11 comments on “Scaffold on Saturday

  1. I’ve just had to Google GSD, you can probably guess the original one that was conjured up in my mind :oops: though thinking about it, that could be a better option ;-)
    Great set of pics, yes they do convey the movement well, especially the plank going down.
    Did A make the whole sign? very sharp & crisp looking.

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    • Actually we call it the German Shepherd Dog party. Mainly because it reminds us what the initials are and then we remember it is Gib Social Democrats (I think!!) – I have written about them somewhere where I did spell it out, probably the election posts in December. The other reason is that they are always barking and snapping. Bit unfair on GSDs though, but as I say, I don’t forget the acronym that way`.

      Didn’t make it, repainted it. I kept checking it out while he was doing it :D It took quite a while as he had to sort out the base coat too which hadn’t been properly prepared. I informed him he should paint the edges as well as the flat front but apparently he knew that…..

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  2. Interesting, the only scaffold we get round here is when another new build goes up. At the moment we are more or less surrounded by new developments. It’s presumably cheaper to build when work is scarce and their are few jobs. The labour is willing to work for cheap as it’s better than nothing, here in the UK.
    I did meet Roger McGough once, he was giving my pickle a prize for her poems, seems like a nice guy not mad at all.

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    • Gib is a bit like when I visited Rome and all the ancient monuments seemed to be permanently scaffolded. Not that I would describe council housing as ancient mons but half the city seems to be scaffolded always. In construction, it is actually cheaper to buy up sites in a recession, the only problem with building then is the lack of sales, so not always a good use of money.

      I used to live next door to Roger. Or rather to his (ex?) wife and their kids, Finn and Tom-Tara. Today’s totally useless trivia. In Liverpool, btw. The kids were very pretty, blond angelic and consequently totally mischievous.

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  3. I have great respect for those who work on scaffolds having used them during some of our remodeling adventures. No wonder they get so good at tossing and pitching stuff up and down – much easier than constantly climbing. It is fun to watch them – like circus jugglers. The building sign is quite elegant – (and well done painting!) Thanks for showing a bit of every day life there

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    • Juggling is absolutely right. Great parallel. Apparently they do shout out the length of whatever they are passing down, and add comments about the weight, any nails, any cut outs etc etc, and then confirm when they have secured it. Still clever work I think.

      Thank you. I didn’t realise it is metalwork, he’s just told me now (after yet another morning on the scaffolding).

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  4. I’m still thinking about the L20/week for gov’t housing. Here is the states you pay that a day..
    In my city, the public/subsidized housing is relatively new (last 3 years). They remodeled and refurbished and tore down some.. Very pretty I might add..

    yes, love the sign..

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